11 September 2020 | Tool Kit

A Designer’s Toolkit for Gender and Urban Millennials in Vietnam

Summary

To complement the aforementioned report, Designer Toolkits for each of the three countries were created. This toolkit focuses on country specific analysis in Vietnam.

Segment profiles in toolkit are arranged in order of millennial men and women that hold the most traditional through to most progressive gender norms. Segment names characterise the ideology of each group in a cross-country comparison of the attitudinal mean for each norm.

This toolkit provides users with:

  • A summary of the segmentation analysis findings from urban millennials in the Philippines.
    • Detailed profiles of key segments of urban millennials in Vietnam that practitioners working on shifting gender norms will be able to run their campaign and activity ideas through, keeping in mind the attitudes, social expectations and behaviours prevalent in each segment
    • A list of suggested areas for further exploration to better understand and work with Vietnamese urban millennials on positively shifting gender norms.

 

Key Segmentation Insights

 

  • The effectiveness of progressive media in contributing to more equal behaviour on gender norms is very broad in Vietnam for both genders and across all four gender norms included in the survey.
  • Across all segments and genders, personal attitudes around job segregation are most unequal of all gender norms
  • Many members of the two more traditional female segments, populated mostly by mothers, wish for a more equal distribution of childcare, but expect disapproval for this, especially from their partners or in-laws. This disapproval appears to have a deterrent effect on many.
  • While a majority of men in all segments share or intend to share childcare equally with their spouses, 4 in 10 men in the neutral segment whose partners do more childcare argue that it is their duty as a women to do so.
  • Education does not emerge as a significant factor in personal attitudes or behaviours in Vietnam.
  • According to regression analysis, religion plays a role in more equal behaviour in Vietnam, with men following religions other than Buddhism being more likely to show progressive behaviour on job segregation and leadership, and non-religious women showing more equal breadwinning behaviour.

 

Contents

 

  • INTRODUCTION
  • KEY INSIGHTS – VIETNAM
  • GENDER ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOURS AT HOME
  • PERSONAL ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOURS ACROSS NORMS
  • A SEGMENTATION OF VIETNAM’S URBAN MILLENNIAL MEN
  • A SEGMENTATION OF VIETNAM’S URBAN MILLENNIAL WOMEN
  • FURTHER EXPLORATION

 

You may also download a copy of the report, Gender Equality Matters 2020: Social Norms, Attitudes and Practices (SNAP) of urban millennials in Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam, and Detailed Annexes from the Knowledge Hub.

Highlights

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