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30 September 2007

Women’s Entrepreneurship Development in Vietnam

Women’s Entrepreneurship Development in Vietnam

The Women’s Entrepreneurship Development in Vietnam report from the Vietnam Women Entrepreneurs Council provides a detailed analysis of the roles, constraints, obstacles, opportunities and development of women entrepreneurs in Vietnam.

This study presents information on the development of women’s businesses in Vietnam, and supports business development service providers and small-medium enterprise support organisations including the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry in improving the design and implementation of women-owned enterprise development programs.

The scope of the research was:

  • To assess the development patterns of women and men-owned enterprises in Vietnam;
  • To identify the constraints and opportunities faced by male and female entrepreneurs as well as their needs and their perspectives on business development;
  • To analyse the difficulties female entrepreneurs are facing in the economy in comparison to male entrepreneurs with an emphasis on the demands for business development services;
  • To identify solutions, and provide recommendations to assist women to integrate into the local, national and global business environment and to design appropriate support programs for women entrepreneurs.

Highlights

  • Two thirds of interviewed women in the research indicated that there were differences in the constraints faced by female and male entrepreneurs, while three quarters of the male entrepreneurs recognised this. 80% of women entrepreneurs mentioned that high pressure from work and family and lack of time is a constraint for their business. The next important constraint of women entrepreneurs is a perceived weakness in establishing social relations and communication, followed by low educational attainments.
  • In the informal economy, household enterprises owned by women do not develop as fast as those owned by men. Household responsibilities, still largely shouldered by women, are the main constraint. According to the criteria used in the research, more women entrepreneurs are “livelihood-oriented” rather than “growth-oriented” not only because of women’s own preferences but also due to the attitudes of the community.
  • Over the past decade, the Vietnam Women Union and others have supported women entrepreneurs to establish women business clubs. Women entrepreneurs find these clubs useful to share information and establish social and/or business networks. At the same time, women entrepreneurs need business development services that require a level of professional service delivery beyond what these clubs can offer. entrepreneurs.
  • The study confirmed that business development services, overall, are equally accessible to both female and male entrepreneurs. There is however a difference in (1) the type of services used by men and women, (2) the providers that serve men and women and (3) the appreciation of men and women regarding the services provided. Women were generally less satisfied with training and more satisfied with advisory services and IT services received.

Contents

  • FOREWARDS
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  • ABBREVIATIONS
  • LIST OF TABLES & FIGURES
  • INTRODUCTION
    • 1 Background
    • 2 Key research questions
    • 3 Methodology
    • 4 General profile of interviewed enterprises
    • 5 Limitations of the research
  • GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE POLICY ENVIROMENT FOR WOMEN ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN VIETNAM
    • 1 Definitions of WomenLed Businesses and Female Entrepreneurs
    • 2 Gender statistics
    • 3 Policy and legal framework for enterprise development and gender equality
  • GENDER PERCEPTIONS OF ENTREPRENEURS
    • 1 Growth-oriented versus livelihood-oriented female and male entrepreneurs
    • 2 Priorities, needs and perspectives of female and male entrepreneurs
  • BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
    • 1 Access to business development services
    • 2 Future needs for business development services
    • 3 Supply of business development services to male and female entrepreneurs
    • 4 Capacity and interest to address needs of male and female entrepreneurs
  • BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS
    • 1 Membership of groups and associations
    • 2 Benefits of female and male members
    • 3 Leadership of business groups and associations
    • 4 Capacity and interest of business associations to address to needs of female and male entrepreneurs
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • RECOMMENDATIONS

VIII. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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