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Quantifying the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender equality on health, social, and economic indicators: a comprehensive review of data from March, 2020, to September, 2021

The Lancet

2022

Global

Report/Paper

Workplace Gender Equality

Quantifying the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender equality on health, social, and economic indicators: a comprehensive review of data from March, 2020, to September, 2021

Quantifying the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender equality on health, social, and economic indicators: a comprehensive review of data from March, 2020, to September, 2021

Quantifying the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender equality on health, social, and economic indicators: a comprehensive review of data from March, 2020, to September, 2021 aims to explore the indirect effects of COVID-19 on gender disparities globally. It looks at publicly available datasets with information on indicators related to vaccine hesitancy and uptake, health care services, economic and work-related issues, education, and safety at home and in the community. 

The research provides comparable estimates of gender disparities for a range of health, social, and economic indicators between March 2020 and September 2021, for 193 countries, spanning all geographical regions and income levels. It also identifies significant gender gaps, showing intensified levels of pre-existing widespread inequalities between men and women during the pandemic.  Findings show there is significant and increasing gender gaps in workforce participation and unpaid labour, highlighting the need for societies to invest in the provision of gender-responsive social protection measures during the pandemic.  

Highlights 

  • Between March 2020 and September 2021, women were more likely to report employment loss than men, as well as forgoing work to care for others. 
  • Women and girls were 1·21 times more likely than men and boys to report dropping out of school for reasons other than school closures. 
  • Women were also 1·23 times more likely than men to report that gender-based violence had increased during the pandemic. 
  • In January 2021, women reported significantly higher vaccine hesitancy compared with men. The gender gap decreased over time, and as of September 2021, had largely closed at the global level. 
  • Women and men were equally likely to report feeling unsafe at home. However, at the regional level, significant gender gaps were observed, with women reporting higher rates than men in Latin America and the Caribbean, central Europe, eastern Europe, central Asia and southeast Asia, east Asia, and Oceania and men reporting higher rates than women in south Asia.

Contents

  • Summary 
  • Introduction 
  • Methods 
  • Results 
  • Discussion 
  • Data sharing 
  • Declaration of Interests 
  • Supplementary Material 
  • References 
  • Uncited References 
  • Article Info 
  • Figures 
  • Tables 
  • Linked Articles 

 

This paper was originally published on The Lancet website. 

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